Things That Are Gold

Welcome to our list of things that are gold!

Gold is valued in many societies and cultures for jewelry-making, its monetary value, and for its conductivity. Jewelry made with gold is seen to be precious, and homewares (such as ceramics, pottery, bags and clothing) can have gold added to them too.

Our list will focus on things that involve or include the metal gold, rather than including things that can be described as being the colour gold (like the sun, or things painted yellow).

Here’s a visual list of things that are gold:

Hopefully that visual list of gold things was useful! Here’s a longer and more descriptive list of things that are gold:

  • Jewelry: Decorative pieces worn on the body. Usually made of precious metals like silver, gold, platinum, etc.
  • Ring: Rings are worn on fingers and are commonly made of solid gold, plated with gold or electroplated with gold.
  • Bracelet: A piece of jewelry worn around the wrist. Commonly made of or plated with gold.
  • Bangle: A stiff ring that is large enough to wear around one’s wrist.
  • Earring: Small pieces of jewelry worn in ear piercings.
  • Pendant: The decorative focus of a necklace. Not all necklaces have pendants.
  • Necklace: A piece of jewelry worn around the neck. Commonly composed of a chain and pendant.
  • Choker: A short necklace that is worn snugly around the neck.
  • Anklet: A piece of jewelry worn around the ankle.
  • Cufflinks: Small pieces of jewelry used to secure the cuffs of long-sleeved formal shirts.
  • Brooch: A decorative pin commonly worn on the front of shirts.
  • Crown: A symbol of monarchy or royalty.
  • Tiara: An ornamental crown, usually encrusted with jewels.
  • Coronet: A small crown.
  • Corolla: An ancient form of crown.
  • Diadem: A type of crown and ornamental headband.
  • Fascinator: A formal, decorative headpiece.
  • Hairpin: A small hair accessory used to pin hair back and away from the face.
  • Hatpin: A decorative pin used for securing one’s hat to their head.
  • Torc: Also known as a torq or torque. A large, stiff ring worn around the neck.
  • Armlet: A lange bangle worn high up on the arm.
  • Class Ring: Also known as a graduate or senior ring. Worn by students and alumni to remember their graduation.
  • Locket: A type of pendant which can be opened and used to store photos inside.
  • Medal: A small, thin disc used for commemorative purposes. Also known as a medallion.
  • Coin: A small metal disc used as a form of currency.
  • Engagement Ring: A decorative ring used to indicate that someone is engaged to be married.
  • Wedding Ring: A plain metal band used to indicate that someone is married.
  • Belly Chain: Also known as a waist chain. A type of body jewelry worn around the waist.
  • Rook Jewelry: A piece of jewelry worn in the rook of the ear.
  • Candlestick: A type of (usually metal) plate used to hold and carry around a lit candlestick.
  • Chandelier: An ornate and decorative light fixture. Classical chandeliers are made to hold candles.
  • Gold Leaf: Very thin gold which is used as decoration in craft and home improvement projects.   
  • Forward Helix Jewelry: Jewelry worn in the forward helix of the ear.
  • Daith Jewelry: Jewelry worn in the daith of the ear.
  • Tragus Jewelry: Jewelry worn in the tragus.
  • Inner Conch Jewelry: Jewelry worn in the inner conch of the ear.
  • Anti-Tragus Jewelry: Jewelry intended for the anti-tragus (a part of the ear).
  • Industrial Jewelry: Jewelry that pierces through the helix twice.
  • Snug Jewelry: Jewelry intended to fit one’s “snug” (a part of the ear).
  • Orbital Jewelry: Hoops that pass through two piercing holes instead of just one.
  • Outer Conch Jewelry: Jewelry intended for the outer conch (a part of the ear).
  • Makuta: Royal headgear worn by Thai monarchs.
  • Toe Ring: Rings worn around the toe.
  • Breastplate: A piece of armour worn over the chest and torso to protect it. Since gold is very soft, gold breastplates are more decorative than functional.
  • Bead: Small decorative pieces that can be strung together to make jewelry.
  • Ornament: Little figurines that are used for decoration.
  • Figurine: Small statues.   
  • Chatelaine: A decorative belt hook worn near the waist. Commonly holds small household items like scissors, thimbles, keys and household seals.
  • Amulet: A type of good luck charm which is specifically intended to bestow protection on the carrier.
  • Promise Ring: Also known as a “pre-engagement ring”. A signifier of commitment to a monogamous relationship.
  • Findings: Small parts of jewelry that hold the overall piece together.
  • Jump Loop: A small ring that is used to hold jewelry together.
  • Signet Ring: A sturdy ring with a large, flat bezel which is decorated with some sort of stamped impression. Can be used to make impressions on wax seals.
  • Gilt Frame: A frame which has been decorated with gold leaf.
  • Statue: A type of free-standing sculpture which generally depicts people, animals or abstract forms.
  • Book Pages: The edges of book pages can be gilded.
  • Ink: Drawing and writing ink can have real gold flakes or pigments mixed in.
  • Paint:  Paints can have real gold particles mixed in with the pigments.
  • Illuminated Manuscripts: A type of manuscript where the text is decorated with intricate, detailed illustrations. It’s common for the drawings to have gold leaf or ink applied.
  • Gilt Mirror: A mirror that has been gilded around the edge, border or frame.
  • Tiles: Pieces of ceramic or pottery that are used to seal, waterproof and decorate an area.
  • Earthenware: Pottery that has been fired below 1200 degrees. Can be glazed or left unglazed.
  • Ceramics: A material used to make items like pots, vases and decorative sculptures. Examples are brick, porcelain and earthenware.
  • Acrylic Paint: A type of paint which is acrylic (or polymer) based. Dissolves in water and is a very common artist’s paint.
  • Oil Paint: A traditional artist’s paint. Uses oil as the vehicle for the pigments.
  • Watercolor Paint: A watersoluble paint which commonly uses gum arabic as the binder.
  • Watercolour Stick: The stick version of watercolour paint.
  • Screenprinting Ink: A thick, dense ink that is used in screenprinting (printing designs on to cloth, wood, metal or paper).
  • Enamel Paint: Paint which dries to a hard and glossy finish. Usually used in applications where a lot of wear and tear is expected to occur.
  • Clock: A timekeeper. Can have gold components, trim or decorations.
  • Kintsugi: The art and practice of using gold and enamel to bond broken pottery.
  • Fork: A piece of cutlery which can have intricate carvings or designs. Used to spear food.
  • Spoon: A piece of cutlery used for eating soups and liquids.
  • Knife: A piece of cutlery used to cut food into smaller pieces.
  • Goblet: Also known as a chalice. A footed cup which is usually used during specific or important ceremonies.
  • Bowl: A type of tableware for softer or more liquid foods.
  • Plate: A piece of flat tableware.
  • Saucer: A small plate.
  • Napkin Ring: A ring used to keep napkins tidy and to identify napkins between weekly laundry days.
  • Tea Cup: A delicate cup used for drinking tea.
  • Pot: A type of cookware with a large belly, used for cooking soups, curries and other soft foods.
  • Vase: A decorative container for holding flowers.
  • Clay: A material which is used in arts and crafts. There are types with silver and gold particles inside.
  • Watch: A portable timekeeper commonly worn around the wrist. Can have a gold face, band, hands or decorations.
  • Face Mask (cosmetic):  Face masks are used for clearing skin or hydration. Some expensive types have gold flakes or particles within.
  • Soap: Some types of soap have gold flakes and particles.
  • Lipstick: A cosmetic for adding colour to lips. Some types have gold flake.
  • Lip Balm: A cosmetic for colouring and hydrating the lips. Some types have gold flake.
  • Moisturiser: Skincare which is used to hydrate the skin. Some types have gold flake or particles.
  • Pen: A writing instrument that uses ink. Fancier, expensive types can have gold nibs, bodies or caps.
  • Pencil: A writing instrument that uses graphite and makes erasable marks.
  • Ink Well: Ink wells are small containers which hold ink for dip and fountain pens. Commonly heavy to ensure they don’t tip over.
  • Fountain Pen (tip): Fountain pen tips are commonly made of either stainless steel or gold. Stainless steel is firm and sturdy, which gold is softer and slowly forms to a writer’s pressure over time.   
  • Planter: A pot used to hold household plants.
  • Hair Jewelry: Pins, jewels and clips used to decorate the hair.
  • Hairband: An elastic band, commonly with decorative pieces used to decorate hair.  
  • Mug: A thick, sturdy cup with a handle used for hot liquids.
  • Sunscreen: A type of skincare used to block UV rays and protect the skin from sunburn and sun damage.
  • Eye Cream: A cream used to hydrate the delicate skin around the eyes.
  • Facial: A beauty service intended to pamper and improve facial skin.   
  • Toothpaste: Some types of toothpaste have gold flakes inside.
  • Makeup Primer: Primer is intended to prep the skin for makeup application.
  • Face Oil: An oil used to hydrate and treat facial skin.
  • Tanning Oil/Mist: An oil used to darken skintone.
  • Bullion: Precious metal in the form of bars or ingots.
  • Gold Bars: A bar of solid gold.
  • Cell Phone: Communication devices which have gold connectors inside.
  • Calculator: A portable device used to aid math equations. Calculators have gold connectors.
  • GPS Unit: Devices used to determine travelling routes.
  • Television: A machine used to view shows and entertainment.
  • Computer: A machine used to complete functions.
  • Laptop: A portable computer.
  • Circuit Board: A board that has electronic components which are soldered and connected together.
  • Connective Pins: Gold pins which conduct electricity.
  • Camera: A device used to take photographs. Has gold in the electrical components.
  • Video Camera: A camera capable of recording video. Has gold in the electrical components.
  • Game Console: A machine used to play video games. Has gold in the electrical components.
  • Tooth Filling: Old fillings were made of gold. More modern solutions are made of composites of other materials.
  • Dental Grills: Grills are a type of jewelry worn over the teeth.
  • Lighter: A portable device that uses lighter fluid to light fire.
  • Mobile Phone Cover: A protective cover for mobile phones. Extremely expensive varieties are plated with gold (or can even be solid gold).
  • Dental Crowns: Also known as a dental cap. Used to improve the strength and appearance of teeth.
  • Dental Bridges: A type of fixed dental restoration.
  • Trophy: An award given in recognition of achievement.
  • Glass: Glass can be coloured a cranberry or ruby colour by adding gold salts to it.
  • Church: Churches commonly have gold features in their architecture and interiors.
  • Taj Mahal: A marble mausoleum that features gold in the architecture.
  • Mosque: Many mosques have gold features and decorations.
  • Cheese: Some expensive cheeses (particularly blue cheese) have gold leaf flaked throughout it.
  • Chocolate: Some expensive chocolates are topped with gold leaf.
  • Pastry: Luxury pastries can have gold leaf.
  • Cake:  Some luxury cakes can be topped with gold leaf.
  • Wedding Dress: Wedding dresses can be made with gold beads, thread, wire and leaf.
  • Coffin: Coffins can feature gold in their decorations.
  • Stereo: Stereos have gold in their electrical components.
  • Radio: Radios have gold in their electrical components.
  • Tablet: Computer tablets feature gold in their connector pins and other electrical components.
  • Dumbbell: Luxury dumbbells can be made of gold.
  • Toilet: In Hong Kong is a luxury solid gold toilet which is part of a gold bathroom worth over $29 million.
  • Thread: Gold can be spun into metal threads used for ornate embroidery.
  • Beer Mug: Also known as beer steins. A sturdy mug with a heavy bottom and a handle.
  • The Majestic Grand Palace (Bangkok): A group of buildings in Bangkok, Thailand.
  • The Golden Pavilion (Kinkakuji): Translates to “Deer Garden Temple”. A Zen Buddhist temple in Japan. One of the most popular buildings and tourist attractions.
  • Balaji Temple: Also known as Balaji Mandir. This name refers to temples dedicated to the Hindu deity Balaji.
  • Iglesia de la Compania: A church with gold decorations and trimmings.
  • Shwedagon Pagoda: Translates to “Golden Dagon Pagoda”. A gilded building in Yandon, Myanmar.
  • Sree Padmanabhaswamy Temple: A Hindu temple in India.
  • Catherine Palace: A Rococo palace in Russia. Used as the residence for the Russian Tsars back in the day.
  • Dome of the Rock (Jerusalem): An Islamic shrine in the Old City of Jerusalem with a gold-plated roof.
  • Matrimandir (India): A place of spiritual significance for those for practice Integral yoga which is covered with golden discs.
  • Golden Roof (Austria): A landmark building in Austria.
  • Lingerie: Expensive, luxury lingerie can have golden threads, beads and accessories strung through.
  • Lemonade: Luxury lemonade can have gold flakes suspended in it.
  • Throne: A seat of sovereignity. Usually painted or gilded with gold.
  • Shirt: Some shirts can have gold threads or gold-plated buttons.
  • Christmas Tree: A solid gold Christmas tree was made in Tokyo and is worth $4.2 million dollars.
  • Ferrari: A $7.5 million dollar gold lamborghini was made for charity.
  • Golden Globe: Awards that acknowledge excellence in acting.
  • Oscar: Another name for the Academy Awards.
  • Pulitzer Prize: An award for achievements in journalism, literature and music.
  • Olympic Gold Medal: The first prize in the Olympic Games.
  • Nobel Prize: A set of international awards given annualy in various categories that recognise achievement or advances in scientific, cultural and academic pursuits.
  • Super Bowl Ring: An award in the National Football League given to the winners of the Super Bowl.
  • Carnegie Medal: A group of awards that recognise excellence in literature, arts and philanthropy.
  • American Bar Association Medal: An honour given by the American Bar Association (a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students which upholds ethics in the profession).
  • Medal of Military Valour: The third highest award for military valour.
  • Darth Vader Mask: A $1.4 million solid gold Darth Vader mask was made by jewelry maker Ginza Tanaka.
  • Ice Cream Sundae: Also known as the Golden Opulence Sundae. Served by special order at Serendipity 3 (a restaurant in New York). Worth $1000 USD and is composed of scoops of Tahitian vanilla ice cream covered in 23k edible gold leaf, candied fruits and sweetened caviar.
  • Pizza: The 24k pizza is composed of edible gold flakes, caviar, truffles and foie gras.
  • Bikini: Luxury bikinis are known to have gold thread and gold decorations.
  • Bra: Luxury bras can have gold thread, gold beads and other golden decorations.
  • C3PO: A character in Star Wars made of gold-coloured metal.
  • ANZ Gothic Bank (Melbourne): A bank in Melbourne with a decorative ceiling, relief-carved wooden doors and wall decorations featuring 23 carat gold leaf.
  • Curse Tablet: A small tablet with a curse written on it. Can sometimes feature gold plating or leaf.
  • Sword Hilt: Also rarely known as a haft or shaft. The part of the sword that the user grips during use.

We hope this list of gold things was useful and that you found what you needed!

We did our best to cover all of the varied meanings of “gold” with our visual gallery of gold things and descriptive list. But if you feel there’s something we missed, please feel free to let us know and leave a comment.

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