Things That Are Translucent

Translucency refers to things that are slightly see-through or transparent, but not entirely. Whether you’re after clothes, materials, toys or food, we hope we have you covered in our list of things that are translucent!

Welcome to our list of things that are translucent!

Here’s a visual list of things that are translucent:

Hopefully that visual list of translucent things was useful! Here’s a longer and more descriptive list of things that are translucent:

  • Smoked Glass: Glass which is held in the smoke of a candle flame, which gives it a less transparent finish.
  • Plastic: A type of material which is malleable and can be molded into many different types of objects. Commonly seen in transparent or semi-transparent uses.
  • Gauze: A type of thin, translucent fabric with an open, loose weave.
  • Jellyfish: Also known as sea jellies. A gelatinous animal with long, stinging tentacles.
  • Glue: An adhesive that is commonly transparent or semi-transparent, depending on the type.
  • Ice: Frozen water. Can be transparent or semi-transparent depending on whether other things have been added to the ice (like fruit, juice, or alcohol).
  • Honey: A viscous food used as a sweetener. Has a clear, amber appearance, sometimes with bubbles inside.
  • Plastic Gloves: Thin, translucent gloves that are usually worn for hygiene purposes (like for medical or food hygiene purposes).
  • Tea: A (usually) hot drink made from brewing dried tea leaves in hot water. Can be sweetened with sugar, berries, or flavoured with mylks and spices.
  • Juice: A sweet drink made from squeezing fruit.
  • Cordial: A sweet, fruit flavoured drink. Can be alcoholic or non-alcoholic.
  • Wine: An alcoholic drink made from fermented grapes.
  • Beer: An alcoholic drink made from fermented hops.
  • Champagne: A French sparkling wine.
  • Mead: An alcoholic drink made with fermented honey and sometimes flavoured with fruits, spices, hops and grains.
  • Rum: A distilled spirit made from fermented sugarcane molasses.
  • Gin: An alcoholic drink that is generally flavoured with juniper berries.
  • Martini: An alcoholic cocktail usually made with gin, vodka or vermouth.
  • Iced Tea: Chilled tea, usually with a fruity flavour like peach or mango.
  • Vodka: A clear alcohol composed mostly of water and ethanol.
  • Cider: An alcohol made from apples.
  • Cucumber: A fruit with a high water content. Thin slices are translucent.
  • Whiskey: A distilled alcohol made from fermented grain.
  • Sangria: A Spanish alcoholic punch made from red wine and fruit.
  • Punch: A type of sweet drink made of a mix of fruit juices. Can be alcoholic or not.
  • Liqueur: An alcoholic mix made of distilled spirits and flavourings like fruits, spices, herbs and sugar.
  • Cognac: A type of French brandy.
  • Watercolour: A transparent watercolour paint which can be built up slowly in opacity.
  • Acrylic Glaze: Glazes are thin layers of paint which are usually transparent or translucent.
  • Oil Paint Glaze: Thin layers of oil paint that are usually translucent.
  • Sunflower Oil: A non-volatile oil made from pressed sunflower seeds.
  • Olive Oil: A common cooking oil made from olives. Has an amber colour.
  • Vegetable Oil: Also known as vegetable fats. Oils extracted from fruit seeds.
  • Grapeseed Oil: Oil extracted from grapes. Commonly used in cooking.
  • Sesame Oil: Oil extracted from sesame seeds. A very fragrant cooking oil.
  • Avocado Oil: A thick oil extracted from avocado seeds. Can be used as a cooking oil or a facial moisturiser.
  • Almond Oil: A thick oil extracted from almonds. Can be used as a cooking oil or a facial moisturiser.
  • Coconut Oil: A translucent white oil extracted from coconuts. Can be used as a cooking oil or a facial moisturiser.
  • Canola Oil: An edible type of vegetable oil.
  • Peanut Oil: Also known as groundnut oil or arachis oil. A type of cooking oil derived from peanuts.
  • Jojoba Oil: Oil made from the seed of the jojoba plant. Also known as jojoba wax. Commonly used as a facial moisturiser.
  • Borage Oil: Oil derived from borage flowers. Commonly used as a facial oil.
  • Argan Oil: An oil taken from the kernels of the argan tree. Commonly used as both a hair and facial oil.
  • Rosehip Oil: A type of pressed seed oil from wild roses. Commonly used as a face oil.
  • Castor Oil: A vegetable oil taken from pressed castor beans. A pale oil used for cooking and not for cosmetic purposes.
  • Tracing Paper: A thin, translucent paper that is used for tracing linework and images. Commonly used in art and architectural fields.
  • Layout Paper: A thin, smooth paper used for markers and ink (anything where you don’t want ink bleeding).
  • Soap: A cleansing product available in solid or liquid form. The liquid form is usually translucent or transparent, depending on whether it’s been coloured or not.
  • PVA Glue: A type of glue which is white in appearance but dries clear.
  • Clear Primer: A preperation material which makes paint stick to surfaces better. Usually clear, but can come in opaque coloured varities too.
  • Bubble Wrap: A packing material filled with little pockets of air to cushion the items being sent.
  • Impasto Gel: A type of gel that thickens paint for impasto-style painting. Usually translucent so as to not mess with the colour of the paint.
  • Gloss Medium: A medium to mix into paint which adds gloss and shine.
  • Modelling Paste: A medium to mix into paint which makes it thicker.
  • Safflower Oil: An oil taken from safflowers, a herby, thistle-like plant.
  • Poppy Oil: An edible oil taken from poppy seeds.
  • Medium Extender: A type of medium which extends the drying time of paint.
  • Binder Medium: A painting medium which can be used as a surface prep or as a sealant.
  • Flow Improver: A painting medium which improves the flow and slip of the paint.
  • Textile Medium: A painting medium which allows paint to be applied to textiles.
  • Fast Drying Oil Medium: A painting medium which makes oil paint dry faster.
  • Gum Arabic: A substance which is used to bind the pigments in watercolour paints. A translucent amber colour.
  • Netting: A type of fabric with open spaces between the yarns.
  • Organza: A sheer fabric with a plain weave, usually made from silk.
  • Clouds: A mass of tiny droplets in the sky.
  • Stained Glass:  A coloured glass, usually used in mosaics or artwork.
  • Tights: A thin, usually sheer type of pant which is stretchy and comfortable.
  • Lingerie: A type of undergarment usually with transparent materials and panels.
  • Raincoats: A waterproof coat which is worn to protect the wearer from rain.
  • Vinyl: A type of material which is plastic-y and usually waterproof.   
  • Stockings: Also known as pantyhose. A type of garment that covers the legs and comes in a variety of colours and thicknesses.
  • Gossamer: A very fine, light, sheer fabric.
  • Rayon: A type of fibre made from celluslose fibre.
  • Nylon: The material that stockings are commonly made of.
  • Silk: A type of protein fibre made from moths. Known for its shine and strength. Can be used to make transparent and translucent materials.
  • Polyester: A type of fabric which is also commonly used to make stockings and other fine, translucent materials.
  • Tulle: A lightweight, stiff, fine type of netting.     
  • Chiffon: A type of light, transparent fabric.
  • Georgett: A sheer, crepe fabric.
  • Mesh: A type of netted fabric.
  • Fishnet: A hosiery with an open, diamond-shaped knit.
  • Lace: A thin, delicate fabric made of lightweight thread.
  • Lame: A woven fabric with metallic fibres.
  • Habotai: A Japanese weave of silk fabric.
  • Voile: A sheer, soft fabric that is usually made of cotton, linen or polyester.
  • Plastic Cup: Simple, disposable cups made of plastic.
  • Plastic Bag: Bags made of translucent plastic, usually for carrying groceries.
  • Pocari Sweat: A Japanese sports drink which is very mildly sweet.
  • Waxed Paper: Translucent white, waxed paper which is used for wrapping up food.
  • Muslin: A cotton with a plain weave. Made in a wide variety of thicknesses and weights including delicate, sheer fabrics.
  • Icing Glaze: A thin layer of icing.
  • Guitar Picks: Guitar picks are usually made of thin, flaxible plastic.   
  • Maple Syrup: A sweet syrup made from the sap of sugar maple. Dark amber in colour and commonly used as a vegan honey alternative.
  • Corn Syrup: A sweet syrup made from corn starch.
  • Dishwashing Liquid: A soapy liquid specially made for washing dishes.
  • Rubbing Alcohol: Refers to either isopropyl alcohol or ethanol. A type of spirit used to sanitise surfaces.    
  • Bleedproof Paper: A smooth paper that is so thin it is translucent. Used for ink and marker work.
  • Polypropylene: A type of thin, flexible plastic sheet that is commonly used for book covers or arts and crafts projects.      
  • Film Negatives: A transparent plastic film that is used in photographic processing.
  • Rice Paper: A thin, delicate paper which is usually handmade in East Asian countries.
  • Tissue: A type of soft, disposable paper which is used for wiping faces.
  • Acrylic Sheets: Sheets of plastic that are commonly brightly coloured. Can be used in jewelry, furniture-making, or for arts and crafts projects.
  • Vaseline: A petroleum-jelly based product used for moisturising and lubrication.
  • Lip Gloss: A cosmetic used for moisturise lips.
  • Lip Balm: Similar to lip gloss, but seemingly more marketed as be for health rather than cosmetics.
  • Greaseproof Paper: A type of waxed paper which can be used for wrapping food or as a tracing paper.
  • Varnish: A sealant used for protecting furniture or paintings. Can also be used to impart a matte or glossy finish.
  • Ink: A transparent, water-soluble art medium that can be lightfast.
  • Dye: A transparent, water-soluble art medium that is less permanent than ink as it generally isn’t lightfast (fades under sunlight).
  • Sticky Tape: A sticky substrate used to hold other surfaces together.          
  • Tissue Paper: Thin, delicate paper used for decoration or giftwrap.   
  • Gummy Bear: Small pieces of gummy fruit candies.
  • Jelly Baby: Similar to gummy bears, but in the shape of a baby. Generally less chewy than gummy bears.    
  • Thin Curtains: A thin fabric used to shield an interior from sunlight, or as a privacy screen.
  • Shower Curtains: Thin waterproof material used as a privacy screen when showering.
  • Smoke: Airborne particles and gases that are released when something is burning or combusting. .
  • Crepe Paper: A type of tissue paper which has been coated with sizing (a sort of glue). “Crispier” than tissue paper.
  • Water Bottle: Bottles are generally made of plastic or glass (unless they’re insulated). 
  • Perspex: Also known as acrylic, plexiglass or acrylic glass. A transparent thermoplastic used in sheet form as a glass alternative.
  • Jelly: A gelatinous dessert. Known as a common hospital food.
  • Jam: A type of topping made out of preserved fruits and sugar.
  • Dragonfruit Slices: A fruit that is grown from cacti. It has white flesh with black seeds, and thin slices of it are translucent.
  • Butter Paper: A thin paper used as a tracing paper or wrapping paper.
  • Ground Glass: Glass that has been ground to result in a flat but rough and matte finish.
  • Frosted Glass: Glass with a pitted, rough surface. Made by sandblasting or acid etching a sheet of glass.
  • Leaves: Plant leaves look translucent if sunlight is shining through them.
  • Hair Gel: A hairstyling product that is used to harden hair into a particular shape. Can also be used to impart a certain level of texture or shine.
  • Eyebrow Gel: Cosmetic gel used to groom eyebrow hairs. Coloured gel can make them look thicker or longer, while clear gel generally just holds them in pace.
  • Eyelash Glue: Strong glue used to fix false eyelashes to the eyelid.
  • Lip Tint: A transparent pigment for colouring lips.
  • Lip Stain: A transparent pigment used to add colour to lips with a matte finish.
  • Nail Polish: Hard coloured coating used to decorate fingernails.
  • Nail Polish Remover: An acetone mix used to dissolve or strip nail polish from fingernails.
  • Hair Shampoo: A thick gel used to clean hair.
  • Perfume: An alcohol-based fragrance used to scent the body and clothes.
  • Hand Sanitiser: An alcohol-based gel used to sanitise skin.
  • Body Wash: A type of soap specialised for washing the body.
  • Body Scrub: A cosmetic product for washing and exfoliating the skin.
  • Petals: Flower petals are generally translucent when the sun shines through them.
  • Hair Wax: A thick, structured hair styling product.
  • Toothpaste: A type of paste used for cleaning teeth.
  • Bandaids: Small bandages used for covering small cuts, abrasions or scratches.
  • Lubricant: A sort of gel that’s used to reduce friction between surfaces.
  • Lozenges: Small medicinal candies.
  • Ice Pack: A plastic pack filled with translucent gel. Intended to soothe and cool down injured areas.
  • Gel Pills: Medicinal pills with a gel capsule. Generally translucent.
  • Essential Oils: Chemical compounds taken from plants used most commonly for cosmetic and aromatherapy purposes.
  • Silica Gel: A porous form of silicon dioxide used as a preservative.
  • Sap: A translucent fluid in plants, most commonly trees.
  • Hydrogel: A type of polymer chain which can be used as a medical dressing.
  • Potato Chip: The thinness of a chip and the oil it’s cooked in make the potato translucent.
  • Vermicelli Noodles: An East Asian type of rice noodle. Very thin, round noodles.
  • Rice Paper Rolls: A sheet of edible rice paper that originates from Vietnam.
  • Agar Agar: A jelly-like substance that comes from red algae.
  • Onion: The layers of onion are translucent when cooked.
  • Pad Thai: Thin, flat rice noodles originating from Thailand.
  • Wonton: When wontons are fried in oil, they become translucent.
  • Kidney Fern: A type of fern with very translucent leaves.
  • Congee: A Asian dish consisting of a soupy, cooked rice.
  • Broth: Clear soup.
  • Transparent Bluish Black Spinel: A dark semiprecious stone with a glossy finish.
  • Topaz: A yellow precious stone which is common in jewelry and ornaments.
  • Quartz: A crystalline mineral made of silicon and oxygen. Can come in different colours, but still translucent.
  • Sapphire: A precious gemstone that comes in different colours but is most famous in blue.
  • Ruby: A precious gem that is famous for its deep red colour.
  • Aquamarine: A semiprecious stone which is a type of beryl. Has a light blue-cyan colour.
  • Tanzanite: A greyish-blue and purple semiprecious stone.
  • Chrome Tourmaline: A type of semiprecious stone with a rainbow shine.
  • Citrine: A type of yellow quartz.
  • Peridot: A lime green semiprecious stone common in jewelry and ornaments.
  • Sinhalite: A borate mineral with a pitted appearance and a subtle yellow colour.
  • Phenakite: A type of mineral with a clear appearance.
  • Euclase: A type of mineral with a deep to light blue colouring.
  • Chrysoberyl: A semiprecious gemstone that looks similar to citrine.
  • Diamond: A solid form of carbon. Very expensive and rare precious stone.
  • Gypsum: A soft mineral which is used as a fertiliser.
  • Dioptase: A teal mineral with a glossy, translucent appearance.
  • Calcite: A type of mineral with a semi-translucent white colouring.
  • Emerald: A precious gemstone which is desired for its rich green colour.
  • Fluorite: A semiprecious gemstone with mixed colours of green, purple and clear.
  • Amber: Fossilized tree resin which is desired for its colour.
  • Amethyst: A semiprecious purple type of quartz.
  • Ametrine: Also known as trystine. A type of quartz which is yellow and purple.
  • Augelite: A crystalline mineral which ranges from yellow to green in colouring.
  • Barite: A crystalline mineral which is generally white or colourless.
  • Boracite: A magnesium-based mineral which can happen in blue-green, colourless, grey, yellow and white varieties.
  • Cerussite: Also known as lead carbonate or white lead ore. A mineral which is a translucent white.  
  • Danburite: A silicate mineral which can be creamy yellow, beige, white or clear.
  • Datolite: A type of neosilicate which can be a translucent, rosy pink or a light green.
  • Euclase: A crystalline silicate mineral with light blue, grey and clear colourings.
  • Heliodor: A type of gold beryl.
  • Herkimer Diamond: Not an actual diamond. A type of double-terminated quartz crystal.
  • Kunzite: A semiprecious gemstone which ranges from pink to lilac.
  • Morganite: Also known as pink beryl, rose beryl or pink emerald. A rare light pink gemstone.
  • Tanzanite: A type of blue and violet mineral.       
  • Sharpear Enope Squid: A moderately-sized squid found throughout tropical and subtropical oceans.
  • Macropinna Microstoma: A fish in the barreleye family. It has a transparent, fluid-filled dome on its head.
  • Salpa Maggiore: A barrel-shaped underwater creature with a gelatinous body.
  • Glass Frog: A type of frog with lime green skin and a translucent abdominal section.
  • Transparent Immortal Jellyfish: A type of jellyfish which is able to revert to a sexually immature stage and back, making it biologically immortal.
  • Ghost Shrimp: Also known as skeleton shrimps. They have transparent exoskeletons.
  • Deep Sea Anglerfish: A bony, deep-sea fish that uses a lure to catch prey.
  • La Palma Glass Frog: A type of small frog that has a transparent body.
  • Ice Fish: Also known as noodlefish. Related to smelt fish. An Eastern Asian fish with a translucent white body.
  • Sea Anemone: A group of marine predatory animals that look like coral and flowers.
  • Barton Springs Salamander: An endangered lungless salamander which rangers in colour from purple to pale yellow.
  • Glass Catfish: Also known as the African Glass Catfish. A freshwater fish native to Africa.                            

We hope this list of translucent things was useful and that you found what you needed!

We did our best to cover all of the varied meanings of “translucent” with our visual gallery of translucent things and descriptive list. But if you feel there’s something we missed, please feel free to let us know and leave a comment.

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